A film to watch

Nomadland – Frances McDormand

Film about gig economy worker

I recently watched a film with my son called Nomadland. He always reviews films as it is his passion, so here is Caleb Barron’s review of Nomadland.

I’m going to put aside the production of this film. Many reviews here take real issue with this film because it is a vehicle for a very wealthy Frances Mcdormand to her stardom with make-believe amongst genuine nomads without their knowledge .There is also, of course, the issue of the depiction of Amazon.

I put these, and other related issues, aside because this film isn’t about the true impact of the recession and the aftermath of 2008. If it were, it would be a toothless and useless attempt at an authentic take on that. What this film is is a careful meditation on grief and living a transient life. It achieves this very well.

The film is necessarily slow and yet never holds in one place for very long. It manages to balance this need to amble slowly through each moment whilst never staying still or lingering. This way, it’s able to create in its form something that is meditative whilst feeling nomadic.

There are moments in which scenes and moments and characters begin to layer on top of each other, supported by a pleasant score, and the film begins to reach for a visual poetry that will transcend itself. However, its transient nature makes it impossible for this ever to be fully achieved. That doesn’t make those sequences weak though. There are powerful moments that caught me by surprise, though these are driven entirely by the real nomads that we meet.

If you’re looking for an authentic exploration of the fallout from 2008 or even the closing of Empire in 2011, a documentary would have been far more satisfactory. If you’re looking for an authentic exploration of these nomads and their lives, I imagine the book is much more impactful and truthful. However, this film is a beautiful, and gentle, vision of living with grief and living transiently. As a viewer, this was more than enough for me to enjoy.’

You can view the trailer on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sxCFZ8_d84

Sara Barron

 

Proximity 2021 Programme

 

Estate
A network looking to serve every estate.

Check out the Proximity website for more information about their packed programme to help mobilise and equip you and your team for urban mission.

Alongside keynote speakers Bob Ekblad, Rachel Gardner, Josh Smedley, Sam Ward, Andy Hawthorne and Sarah Small, there’ll also be testimonies from Eden teams, interviews with Eden members and leaders and worshipping together.

Plus they’ve got a bunch of TED style talks focussing on key topics such as:

  • Working across barriers to reach communities
  • Church planting in urban communities
  • Mental health and wellbeing
  • Working in developing nations
  • Climate and Community
  • Creatively engaging with your community
  • Raising up local leaders

There will also be an opportunity to join in a Q&A session with our keynote speakers.

For more info please visit: Proximity 2021: Mobilise – The Message

All the sessions will be shown on our Facebook and Youtube pages so please keep an eye on these for regular updates/promo material. If you can share/like any of our posts that would be much appreciated.

Blessings,

Eden Network

 

 

Webinar: C of E vision for the 2020s Monday 26 April, 12.30 – 1.30pm

Church of England Logo

Join Archbishop Stephen Cottrell and panel members to find out more about the emerging vision and strategic priorities for the Church for the next decade.

This is the second in a series of webinars that will explore what it means to be a church that is centred on Jesus Christ and shaped by Jesus Christ – a church that is simpler, humbler, bolder.

In this session, we will be focussing on the strategic priority to be a church where the mixed ecology of many forms of church is the norm. We will be using questions raised in the first of our webinars in this series to inform the content of this session.

As well as hearing from the panel, there will be time for your questions and to find out what the vision and in particular this strategic priority means for you, your church, or diocese.

  • a church of missionary disciples
  • a church which is younger and more diverse
  • a church where the mixed ecology of many forms of church are the norm.

We want to engage with as many people as possible through these webinars. Please forward this invitation to your church networks and colleagues.

Register for the webinar 

“Our vision for being a Jesus Christ centred and Jesus Christ shaped Church will help us focus on what truly matters: the Christ like life of prayer; our worship and our service; the proclamation of God’s good purposes for the world; and how all this is fed and nurtured by word and sacrament, and by our own humble acknowledgment of our need of God’s grace, so that, together, we can build a better, more hopeful future.”
Archbishop of York, Stephen Cottrell – General Synod, February 2021

Find out more:

 

Introducing Christine McAteer Support Officer of NECN

 

NECN Support Officer
NECN Support Officer

 

Central to my faith journey is being the person God has created me to be. This might sound incredibly selfish. What about serving others, fighting injustice, self-sacrifice and so on?

When Jesus said, “I am the Way, the Truth and the Life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” (John 14:6) I don’t think he was asking us to force anyone to become a Christian. I think he was modelling how to be yourself and by being yourself and not some caricature, you will attract others to following Jesus. As Catherine of Siena once said,

“Be who you were meant to be and you will set the whole world on fire.”

It’s about listening to God and listening to others as well as being heard. Dietrich Bonhoeffer once said, “The first service of love one owes to others is listening to them.” The first word of the greatest commandment in Deut 6:4 is שְׁמוֹעַ “Shema” which means “Listen!” “Hear O Israel, the LORD our God, the LORD God is one.” And following on from that is the command to “Love your neighbour.”

I started my working life teaching RE and taught for 13 years. Although I enjoyed teaching, most of the time, I felt deeply unhappy and restless. One Lent I decided to take up exercise. A friend of mine persuaded me to try karate. I wasn’t sure that I wanted to hit people, but I gave it a go and found that I really enjoyed it! The karate gave me a new lease of life and energy and helped me to reconnect a part of myself that I suppressed. Eventually I found the courage to leave the security of teaching, the year I achieved my first brown belt grade.

I’d also heard an excellent sermon at the start of that academic year by an ex-Anglican priest where he had referred to a talk by JK Rowling to Harvard graduates about the importance of failure and the use of the imagination. I had become too comfortable, even though I was unhappy. I had forgotten how to be bold and daring. It felt like one of several nudges from God. It was time to move on.

Stay Alert to the Spirit

 

Holy Spirit

 

Are you looking for a new course to stay connected with young people in your community? Read all about the ‘Stay Alert to the Spirit’ programme put together by Jesus Shaped People…

Despite our technology, wealth and 21st Century ‘know how’ we’ve been humbled by a virus, like an elite Premier League Football Club knocked out of the FA Cup by a team no one has heard of. How did this happen, how can we get rid of it, when will it end, how is it going to affect my future are legitimate questions. At Jesus Shaped People we felt there is another important question: What is God saying to the churches?

This ‘liminal space’ is a teaching moment and waiting time. The spectre of suffering, death, economic meltdown, loss, sudden change, and acute anxiety has at least temporarily arrested our attention and captured collective imagination.

Young people have been especially hit hard by the pandemic.  ‘Stay Alert to the Spirit’ (SATS) is a 7 week resource that includes material/ideas for worship, small groups, sermons, teaching and intergenerational worship to be used in buildings or on line and offered free of charge.  SATS is not an answer but a tool to help churches gather around this question; ‘What is God saying to the Churches’ and allow voices on the margins to be properly heard and be a part of the future.

For further info contact:

Brendan Bassett   07470136193  brendan@jesusshapedpeople.net   
Or visit our website www.jesusshapedpeople.net

For specific queries about the intergenerational material contact dawn@jesusshapedpeople.net

Proximity Conference 2021

Network for every estate

We wanted to let you know that Proximity is heading back online for 2021!

Running from 7-8 May, Proximity is our annual Urban Mission Conference and it’s totally FREE. We’ll be joined by inspiring and challenging speakers including Bob Ekblad, Rachel Gardner, Josh Smedley, Andy Hawthorne, Sam Ward and Sarah Small who will help each of us explore God’s call to his church to Mobilise.

Over the two days we’ll be digging into the book of Philippians and will be equipped, inspired and challenged for urban mission through teaching, TED-style talks, stories and worship. Whether you’re just exploring the call to mission, or whether you’re in this for the long-haul, it’s time to mobilise!

To book your free tickets and to keep up-to-date with our programme and speakers visit: Proximity 2021: Mobilise – The Message

Please do promote in your churches and networks and share with your friends.

The World of Jesus a New Course from Jesus Shaped People

Jesus Shaped People

A new 8 week online course on Wednesdays from April 7th, 7–9 pm

Gordon Dey from Jesus Shaped People has created an eight-week, Zoom-driven course entitled World of Jesus that draws from his experience of leading pilgrimage groups to Israel and Palestine over the past 30 years.

Gordon is offering the opportunity for people belonging to JSP linked churches to experience World of Jesus on Wednesday evenings from 7pm to 9pm between Easter and Pentecost, beginning on Wednesday April 7th. The course will give insight into the context of Jesus’ ministry—the geography and history, and the way people lived their lives under Herodian and Roman control and influence, using maps, photos and other graphics. Afterwards we’ll explore the impact of this on the church today in small groups and plenary questions.

There is no charge to those taking part, however donations in support of Jesus Shaped People are warmly encouraged! Information of how to do this is provided on the JSP website: www.jesusshapedpeople.net

flyer is also available to download and print on the website that can be used as a poster. If you want to take part please book a place with Gordon: gordon@jesusshapedpeople.net. Your place will then be confirmed and you will be sent more detail about each of the sessions. Later those who book a place will be sent a zoom code.

Places are limited, so ‘first come first served’.

Every blessing for Passiontide and Easter.

Gordon Dey

Jesus Shaped People offers programmes and learning resources especially for smaller inner city, urban and social housing estate churches.

What Kind of Mission for the 21st Century?

Urban Mission

Calling all urban church leaders and clergy! A wonderful opportunity to hear Bishop John Perumbalath speak on mission will take place at Birmingham Cathedral as part of a day commemorating the Christian socialist, Charles Gore. This will take place on Thursday 16th September from 10.30 am until 3.30 pm.

Register for free enquiries@birminghamcathedral.com.

You may also be interested in the first annual Gore Lecture which will take place the same evening at 7.30 pm. For further details see https://estatechurches.org/category/events/

Apostolic training for an indigenous ministry?

Estates practitioner and priest, Joe Hasler offers some thoughts around training local people for God’s mission in extracts from his poem below. The whole reflection can be downloaded at the end of this post.

Bristol Estate

Apostolic means ‘Go to’

or ‘being sent’.

An Apostle meaning

‘one sent on a mission’.

  •     We have had the decade for evangelism,
  • a pre-occupation with leadership,
  • and now the emphasis on discipleship.

I hope this means

the direction is getting closer

to listening

to the people on the ground.

 

An important message I have heard in all this is,

“Do we want a ‘Come to’ church

or a ‘Go to’ church.”

Is it desirable to move from maintenance to mission?


So how do the trainers

and their institutions

model God’s mission

in the way we do training?

We have been trying to address these issues in the Northern Ark Mission Initiative in North Bristol.

The pilot period has come to the end of its initial three years.

Some things could have been done better

but we ask

‘Why do people from local council built housing estate congregations in Bristol come forward into growing ministry teams?”

38 people from 4 out of 6 parishes have stepped out so far;

with some to become licensed readers (6),

and some to become ordained priests (3).

Making ministry training

in a mission model

must be one of the driving forces.

But for all the things

we might have done better

here are four things we did well.

  1. Take the training to the people.
  2. Go in twos. (THE INTERVENTIONISTS)
  3. Forming learning communities in the culture.
  4. Practise what we want to preach.

The experience is that the trainers model a ‘go to’ approach

and learning is integrated

with activity in mission.


The beginning

and the end

is in becoming a more self-sufficient congregation

that is more dependent on God.

 

Indigenous is not isolationist.

It is making a stronger contribution to a bigger whole.

But local interventions

can bring the confidence

to let this, happen.

 

I think this is mainly

because the trainers,

no matter how good they are,

‘go to’.

The result is of a local congregation that naturally goes to the wider world and church.

This is what has been modelled in their training.


(More information about the initiative can be found at www.joehasler.co.uk   then find  other stuff and click on drop down menu for northern ark publications.)

To download the whole reflection click Apostolic Training for Ministry and New Pathways

Ken Leech Memorial Lecture: The Eye of the Storm

The Eye of the Storm

Ken Leech Memorial Lecture 2020 – “Learning from Ken: how to breathe in the tempest “

About this Event

Ken Leech Memorial Lecture 2020 will be given by the Right Reverend Paul Bayes, Bishop of Liverpool, on Tuesday 3rd November 2020, at 7.30.

Paul Bayes has been the Bishop of Liverpool since 2014. His ministry is marked by his concern for equality and justice.

The Lecture is held in memory of Father Ken Leech (1939-2015), who spent his whole ministry caring for the marginalised and disadvantaged. He authored many books on theology, pastoral care, and social justice.

To register visit:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/ken-leech-memorial-lecture-2020-tickets-126385603743